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Posts tagged ‘books’

ENTER THE CAT’S MAW — ON WATTPAD!!!

February 10, 2014

Brooke Burgess

Enter the Shadowlands...

Howdy friends!

With the first draft of my children’s book complete — and in the capable hands of a hungry team of beta readers — I’m keen to share a bit more with you. And what’s the best way to do that, you ask..?

Enter WATTPAD

This is THE social media platform for readers, writers, and anyone invested in experiencing the collision between technology and the written word.  Millions of users. Countless stories. Mind-bending genres. And it’s all being updated with new content — based on your feedback — every second, of every minute, or every goddamn day!

So take a minute to click the link above and scope the prologue and a chunk of Chapter 1. If you dig it, then please leave a ‘star’ and a comment on the site, sign up for updates, and spread the good word!

Expect more updates soon, dear friends — including release dates, illustrator news, and even audiobook talent announcements (could a voice from the past be making a collaborative return?).

Thanks…for reading :)

BB

TCM-prologue-draft-small

WORDSMITHS: 5 WAYS TO SHARPEN YOUR EDIT

January 7, 2014

Brooke Burgess

The Edit

I’m about to edit a book. Seems like a straightforward mission statement, right? But for me, the prose editing process generates a special, singular kind of fear. I’ll get to that in a second.

When you’re launching an initial assault on the blank page, there’s a leap-into-the-void, roll-the-goddamn-dice, what’s-the-worst-that-can-happen? kinda quality to the whole thing. That’s why I actually enjoyed the NaNoWriMo exercise – you show up, put your head down, and commit to your daily word count. That’s it. So, if your outline was strong enough, and your characters were clearly defined, and you respected your narrative roadmap (no matter how many shortcuts or off-road excursions you indulged in along the way), you’re gonna end up with something. And, unless you’re a complete tool, said thing will resemble an actual ‘story’, with words and paragraphs and dialogue and chapters and a beginning, middle, and end. Groovy.

But then comes the hard part. You see, in keeping with my oft-stated transmedia philosophy, Storytelling (on singular or multiple platforms) is akin to the mining, cutting, and polishing of a precious gem. Writing in prose has only reaffirmed that for me. The story outline is where one surveys the land and takes soil samples. The first draft is digging and sifting until you find the raw stone. Which makes the hardest part – the detailed cutting and polishing phases, which give the stone its unique beauty and shine — the edit.

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GAME OF THRONES (TCS)

April 9, 2012

Brooke Burgess

eddard-game-of-thrones-preview-sean-bean

As promised, it’s time for our first Transmedia Case Study (TCS).  In this bi-weekly series, I’ll be digging into a recognizable Big Media property – a major film, broadcast TV show, published book series, AAA videogame, popular comic book, indy/cult hit, or even a beloved consumer brand – and evaluating the effectiveness of its transmedia campaign.  To get things rolling, let’s start with an example of transmedia done right.  Ladies and gentlemen, I give you…GAME OF THRONES.

It’s a property close to my heart.  I read the first book in the early 90’s, and George R.R Martin’s fascinating tale of political intrigue, medieval warfare, and ‘mature fantasy’ captured me in its singular gravity.  Sadly, ‘life’ got in the way (as it so often does), and with no widespread Internets to keep abreast of series developments, A Song of Ice and Fire fell off the narrative radar.  But my time in Westeros would not be forgotten…

Flash-forward nearly 20 years.

I caught wind of the show going into development at HBO in 2007.  My biggest concern – you know, aside from the obvious ‘How the Hell are they going to pull off the sheer scope on TV???’ – was with audience awareness.  Sure, the books were best-sellers – and ‘fantasy’ had gotten a much-needed boost thanks to Tolkien going mainstream – but what about the masses? How were they going to reach the kind of audience numbers that would keep a show like this on the air, justify the hefty per-episode budgets, and make it must-see appointment television?

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